Do you know what makes your favorite foods aphrodisiac?

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, (FDA), there is no such thing as an aphrodisiac. But history tells a different story. Through the ages, some of the world’s most tempting foods were treasured as aphrodisiac. Some of these foods have a suggestive shape. Many have arousing aromas or a sensual mouthfeel. Some foods of love raise body temperature. And some make the eater’s lips plump up with kissable softness.

Most importantly, modern science has helped us to understand that, in addition to an ability to caress the tongue or lower inhibition, the majority of these foods have a proven nutritional effect on the body. Many provide energy for a night of passion. Some support the system that triggers feelings of love or sexual arousal. Yet others help to increase blood flow. And others offer the nutrients to support sexual hormone production. So, do aphrodisiacs really exist? Read for yourself and you make the call. You already know where we stand on the topic! Bon appetit.

If you’re interested in a more in-depth explanation of what defines an aphrodisiac food, check out my article, appropriately titled What is an Aphrodisiac Food?

a
abalone
absinthe
acai
apple
apricot
arugula (rocket)
asparagus
avocado

b
bacon
banana
basil
bay leaf (bay laurel)
beets
blowfish
blueberries

c
caviar
celery
champagne
cheese
cherry
chile pepper
chocolate
cinnamon
clams
coconut water
coffee
conch
cranberry
cucumber

e
eggs

f
fennel
figs
fugu (blowfish)

g
garlic
ginger
ginkgo
ginseng
goji berry
grapes

h
hemp
honey

k
kava

l
lavender
lobster

m
mallow (marshmallow)
mango
maple syrup
mint
mushrooms
mussels
mustard

n
nutmeg
nuts

o
oats
oysters

p
peach
pepper
pineapple
pomegranate
pumpkin
pumpkin pie spice

r
raspberry
red wine
rocket (arugula)
rosemary

s
saffron
salmon
sandalwood
scallops
seaweed
sea cucumber
sea urchin (uni)
shark
shrimp
strawberry
sushi

t
tarragon
tomato
truffle
tuna
turkey

u
uni (sea urchin)

v
vanilla

w
watermelon
wedding cake
wolfberry (goji berry)

y
yarsabumba